What’s Up With the Latest Mobile Apps?

With mobile application trends taking over the market, more and more people are using their smartphones to access to the internet, thus eradicating the use of personal computers. According to a recent study, using a smartphone for making phone calls is the fifth most popular use of the gadget. So, if you are among those, who still think that mobile phones are all about making and receiving calls, then you definitely need to give it a second thought.

These days, people spend more time using their android phones to browse internet, check mails, social networking, gaming, music and downloading mobile apps. With smart phones gaining popularity, many devices and brands have started penetrating in the market. According to a recent analysis, more than 1.8 million mobile apps have been downloaded more than 70 billion times and the number is continuously increasing. Some of the best-selling mobile apps in the year 2013 are:

Whats App Messenger: This is a simple, spontaneous and a fantastic alternative to sending text messages, which are chargeable. It allows people to send messages, share photos, audio files and videos. But the best part is that it is completely free. According to a recent report, India is the 3rd largest smartphone market after China and US that has downloaded maximum number of messaging applications. So, the Japanese messaging application provider is aiming to double its user base in India to 20 million by the year-end.

Imo Messenger: This free app supports everything from Facebook to Skype and people can link up to multiple accounts. Voice calls, multimedia files or even group messaging sessions, users have endless flexibility to use this multi-platform solution.

Tapatalk Forum App: If you wish to browse and post on forums without any hassles, then this is the right app. You can keep yourself updated with all the threads in the simple interface of Tapatalk by just paying a few bucks.

Dolphin Browser: This is a competitor of Chrome that offers Sonar, add-on support and gesture. With these in your mobile, you can search, navigate with voice commands, bookmark and even share. It offers more than 55 add-ons to choose from and is absolutely free.

Best Apps Market: If you are too confused about choosing the best apps in the market, then this is the right tool. This is free and allows you to organize your downloads with the help of handpicked lists and tools.

This is not it. There are plenty of other mobile apps like GasBuddy, Widegtsoid, iTriage Mobile Health, Chrome Beta, Pulse News and Swift Key 3 keyboard, which are available for free of cost and are absolutely mind-blowing.

Teaching English Abroad Jobs: Points To Remember

English is the new lingua franca in international trade, business, higher education, diplomatic relations and other forms of communication. So, the knowledge of English has become a necessity, which in turn has boosted teaching opportunities abroad. A native English speaker is the best resource for teaching English abroad. However, a formal training in English as Second Language (ESL), be it Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL) or Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL), is beneficial for people looking to teach English. There are great job opportunities for ESL teachers in Asia, Eastern Europe and other areas where English is not the native language. However, ESL jobs are also available in countries whose native language is English.
Teaching English Abroad: Importance of TEFL or TESOL Course
A TEFL or a TESOL course is a training program that provides the necessary skills and the confidence for teaching English abroad, as a foreign language or a second language. It teaches ways of making lessons interesting and dealing with different student requirements. These courses can range from intensive weekend courses to flexible online courses and short-term overseas courses. Specialized courses for teaching business English or teaching young learners also exist. You can find a host of English teaching jobs abroad through recruitment agencies and TEFL course centers or professional agencies.
Teaching English Abroad: Points to Consider
Although ESL or EFL teachers can find high-paying short term teaching English abroad jobs in the Middle East, Taiwan, Japan and South Korea, it is important to remember the following points:
Know the rules of teaching foreign languages in the country where you are applying for the job. Some countries place restrictions on opening foreign language schools.
Check the credentials of the employer who is offering you the job. To protect yourself from unscrupulous elements, rely on established and reputed networks or forums that connect students, schools and teachers of ESL.
Awareness about the political situation of the country that you are traveling to is a must. Political unrest, civil war or any other disturbance may threaten the stability of an otherwise lucrative job.
At Totalesl.com, you can learn about the best learning and job opportunities that exist in ESL. This one-stop-shop for English learning and teaching needs also provides you the resources for guiding you in the best direction possible.

English Courses Australia – Cheap English Schools – English For Tourists

Einstein College

English language has gained tremendous amount of importance all around the world because of its unique characteristics. The english language is spoken by major developed countries in the world. There is a huge competition among the students to pursue their career in developed english speaking countries like Australia, United States of America, United Kingdom, New Zealand etc.
English is an official language in NATO, European Union, United Nations, Commonwealth of Nation, International Olympic Committee. English is the official language in more than 52 countries all over the world. English is the international language which is used in international communication, diplomacy, business and information technology.

Many individuals all around the world are trying to learn English language to derive maximum benefits for their career. The major challenge in English learning is the amount of time you spend. The quality learning material decides how well you can gain knowledge in English language. Speaking , writing, reading, listening are important factors in learning any language. Furthermore regular practice of english language learning helps you to gain many good career prospects in education as well in employment. English language continuous to be most effective language in coming decades. english courses australia provide you better career opportunities. There is a huge requirement for the English language teachers all around the world.

There are many english training institutes which will enable you to equip with necessary English skills. There is a step by step procedure adapted by the english training institutes. Grammar, Effective sentence formation, seminars though are the oldest methods but are the most effective methods of learning english language. English language teaching have undergone many changes and the use of interactive software helps the students to learn the english language more effectively. There are many cheap english schools which are specialized in providing effective English training. There are also courses like English for tourists which help them to learn the basic English language.

International Schools – The Right Grounding Place For Your Child

Children are the building blocks of every society, and for every society to flourish and thrive, it is essential that its children receive the right guidance from their parents and education from its schools. This helps the children build a secure future for them along with strengthening the pillars of society. In today’s modern world, schools provide the initiative to provide decent education to children, and amongst the galaxy of schools with varied missions and goals, international schools are slowly stealing the limelight.

International Schools usually offer the IB/ICSE curriculum that was once the forte of the children of diplomats and ambassadors posted in different countries as part of their job. As international schools make their mark in India, they now offer the best possible educational programs that combine international methodologies along with a touch of localized essence.

With the advent of globalization and increased awareness of the world, children are now exposed to a world of myriad opportunities. The world boundaries are now shrinking and there are now distinct possibilities for younger children. International schools function on the maxim that children are the future of the world. As children experience the world of international education, international schools in India root their foundation in time tested core Indian values. The focus is on a world of knowledge, competence, and opportunity.

Today, most international schools in India imbibe an international approach with a global curriculum and an emphasis on skills and knowledge that have a worldwide appeal. Children today deserve the best of core values as well as international education as well as grounding in values and culture. For this reason, the schools are burdened with the task of igniting young minds as well as providing them with attention within as well as outside the classroom. With education in the right direction, children become courageous and develop their integrity as well as excellence. Parents can thus see their children evolve into a confident and mature child.

International schooling is centered on the belief that one goes to school to learn and simultaneously develop new relationships with their peers and faculty. The principal aim of the teachers and the rest of the staff are to develop a strong bond between the children and the institution of learning and mould them into responsible and global citizens. Most international schools in the country converge interactive teaching along with learning practices that covers a broad curriculum policy. This caters to a multifaceted development of all learners across the school. The result is an all round development of the child’s social, emotional, intellectual, as well as physical development.

Children get motivated to achieve higher academic standards, where they nurture the skills to become global citizens by imbibing a sense of national pride along with national understanding. With the aim of nurturing responsible citizens of the future, international schools of today pool in their experience and confidence to create a committed, responsible, and understanding child.

Ten Things Highly Successful Women Would Have Done Differently In High School

What lies behind you and what lies in front of you, pales in comparison to what lies inside of you” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

About a year ago, I read an article written by someone who was giving advice to her younger self. I found it interesting, as I am always interested in learning from my mistakes and the mistakes of others. I am very focused on success for young women in high school and I thought it might be interesting to find out what some of the most successful women would have done differently in high school. High school really is the springboard to future success and I am forever and always a proponent of hard work and high achievement.

I devised a questionnaire and asked 60 highly successful women what advice they would give to current high school girls yearning for great successes in their lives, as well. My list of successful women included those that had reached the pinnacle of success in their respective fields, such as a Supreme Court Justice, several Chief Executive Officers and Chief Financial Officers, Law and Medical Professors at the most elite colleges in the country, a University President, a Governor, several Senators, a championship winning athlete, an Academy Award winning actress and a Pulitzer Prize winning author. Although it took me about a year to contact and compile my responses from these women, I was pleasantly surprised at their willingness to communicate their experiences and advice with me. It was also interesting that many of these women shared similar responses. In my prior research studies, high school girls who successfully embraced this advice ended up at the most elite colleges in the country. There may not be a scientific correlation at this time, but it is an interesting outcome, nonetheless. I have published this in my other articles, which I encourage you to read.

The following are the top ten things these highly successful women would have done differently in high school and some advice they shared, ranked in order of the most responses:

1. Never Let Go Of Your Dreams And Dream Big– Your dreams become your inspiration to work harder and set goals for high achievement. These women related they purposely picked goals that were difficult to achieve, such as making partner in a prestigious law firm or becoming a tenured professor by the age of 35, becoming a Supreme Court Justice and running for the office of Governor and winning. Just because a state has never elected a female Governor before doesn’t mean it can’t happen. If you believe in yourself, you can make it happen. If you focus, work hard enough and stay away from the distractions in high school, anything is possible. Many of the women interviewed told me that high school, retrospectively, is a little part of a bigger picture and they focused on the long term, not the short term. They advised to stay away from the drama and negative peer pressure in high school and just follow your own unique path.

2. Learn To Say “No”– Don’t pretend to be something you are not; be yourself. You are not out to please the world and you shouldn’t do anything you are not comfortable doing. “No” is a very powerful word and the respondents alluded it will serve you well in the future if you learn this now. They also commented is it better to excel in a few areas than to spread yourself so thin you can’t excel at anything. They also reiterated that parents are usually right, so listen to them and don’t discount their advice and opinions because experience does matter.

3. Success And Money Really Are A Result Of Hard Work, Grit & Determination– Sorry to burst your bubble, but there really is no free ride or luck that takes you to the top. It is all about hard work, determination and dedication. These women kept themselves focused on the end result and worked longer hours and networked more than their peers. They were willing to take risks, work harder and pursue higher levels of education. An interesting point was all these women sacrificed something today for a greater return tomorrow. The respondents related their exceptionalism and their drive to keep achieving as drivers of their success.

4. Stay Away From People Who Tell You That You Can’t– The overwhelming advice on this point was not to let others judge you. It doesn’t matter what others think about you, it’s what you think of yourself that makes all the difference. It is this strong sense of self that will point you in the direction and the choices you will eventually have to make to determine your future endeavors. Keeping toxic people out of your life allows you to succeed and focus on accomplishing your goals. They also advised not to give up on something you are passionate about. Many told me they regretted quitting playing the piano or another musical instrument and cannot afford the time to learn it today. Time is precious and they advised sticking to a hobby or passion, as it will enrich your life at a later time.

5. Grudges Will Never Take You Anywhere, Let Them Go– It is important to understand that everyone has an opinion or belief that may differ from yours and should be the basis for discussion and learning, not resentment and avoidance. The capacity to forgive has produced great leaders, such as Nelson Mandela and Mahatma Gandhi, who recognized that by forgiving people that hold you back, that have managed to hurt you, and forgiving yourself for the people whom you have hurt, you alleviate the toxicity that steals your energy, ambition and self-confidence. Essentially, it diminishes your leadership ability. Learn from the past and embrace the future.

6. Take Care Of Yourself Now– Studies keep coming out that show what we do when are younger may have dire consequences on us when we age. Now is the time to develop healthy lifestyle changes. Exercising and eating healthy, along with the determination not to smoke, take drugs or abuse alcohol, are all imperative for leading a longer, happier and more successful life. Get at least seven hours of sleep a night and try to avoid the drive through. The respondents said these bad habits will show up in your 30’s and 40’s and prevention is the key.

7. Be Curious And Take Risks– “You can’t cross the sea merely by standing and staring at the water”, is a famous quote by Rabindranath Tagore. Every reaction requires an action. You’ll never achieve your goals if you don’t take a chance. With every decision comes risk, but you only need to win more than not. The fact is you are not even in the game without taking the risk of stepping in. Take the road less traveled- these respondents said it made all the difference in their lives.

8. Failure Is Inevitable, But It Can Make You Stronger– One thing these women had in common is they were rejected from something they intensely wanted at least one time. Each one took it as a sign to work even harder and that’s what they attribute to their great success. Every one of your failures is laying out a path for your eventual success. Michael Jordan, who is regarded as the greatest basketball player in history, was cut from his varsity team numerous times and said, “I’ve failed over and over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed.” How do you really know what a success is if you have not experienced a failure? These women advised embracing the failure and working harder to get an even better outcome.

9. Study, Study and Study– Get off the video games and reality television and put the time into improving your grades. With all the social media out there, it is hard to not let it invade your life, but you must. The difference between a valedictorian and a salutatorian can typically come down to one grade in high school. Colleges love to boast about the number of valedictorians and often provide greater scholarships and admissions. Students who work hard and achieve in high school learn to develop high expectations and demand stellar outcomes from themselves, which, in turn, become life-long traits. As Socrates said so eloquently, “Wisdom begins in Wonder”, so start contemplating and studying.

10. Get Into The College You Really Want To Attend– According to Vanderbilt economics and law professor Joni Hersch, who has researched and published on this subject, students who attend low-tier undergraduate institutions seldom transition to top-tier graduate schools. Even more daunting is those who do, rarely achieve the earnings power of peers who attended elite colleges. Women have it much tougher- A lower tier college graduate who attended a higher tier law school, as an example, earns only about 60 percent of the salary of a lawyer with a bachelor’s degree from an elite level college. Christopher Avery, a professor of public policy at Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, has published and researched college as a mode of social mobility. Students who earn a degree from an elite college, even those with unremarkable grades and test scores, are handily too far ahead of those who don’t, which is why they will never catch up. The networks, resources and teaching at the elite schools typically cannot be rivaled by other colleges and set the path for success into motion. The most elite recruiters go to the most elite colleges. Recruiters often like to select candidates from the elite colleges they attended. The take away here is work hard and get into the best college you can. It will make a difference, according to the respondents and the research.

This was an interesting and thought provoking project for me personally. As a high school sophomore with two high achieving sisters currently attending elite colleges, I have seen firsthand how the right choices in high school can impact options for future success. I hope this list helps guide you to a life filled with opportunity.

Dual Language Education

In the midst of multiple international conflicts, an interwoven global economy and the shrinking nature of our techno-driven world, language learning can no longer be considered an elective subject, but should rather be a necessary core to modern education. Typically, we put language learning on hold through much of elementary school, but this is the time when children’s minds are most adept for absorbing words and languages.

Schools throughout the country are realizing this need and implementing Dual Language Education.

From neighborhood schools to charters and magnets, these schools are providing their students with greater opportunity to academically compete with students abroad by diversifying their skill sets in areas of communication, problem-solving, critical thinking, and analysis. Some education leaders are even predicting that dual language education will be the future of American schools.

Dual Language Education vs. ESL/ESOL

Dual Language Education is often confused with ESL/ESOL programs. While there are similarities between the two, there are major differences in their agendas.

The Breakdown: Compare & Contrast

Dual Language Education
– Schoolwide approach
– Goal: To provide ALL students with the skills (reading, writing, speaking and listening) necessary to become fluent in both languages
– Programs usually begin at a young age (kindergarten or 1st grade) and continue for at least five years
– Students automatically opt in by enrolling in the school
– Depending on the type of program, requirements are placed on instructional time in partner language
– Not available in every school

ESL/ESOL
– Select group of students
– Goal: To provide non-native English-speaking students with the proper skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) necessary for academic success
– Program entrance is on an individual basis and can begin at any grade for any length of period
– Students may opt in or may be chosen based on entrance exams/placement tests
– Program is supplemental to classroom curriculum
– Most public schools have ESL/ESOL

Variation in Dual Language Education
Within the last few years, there has been a steady increase in the number of dual language programs throughout the United States. Results vary depending on the type of program and structure implemented however overall results remain positive. Parents and educators have taken great interest in such programs because they feel they will provide students with multilevel thinking strategies, stronger linguistic skills, and greater communication skills to succeed in the interdependent world.

Dual language programs can be classified into four categories:

1. Two-way Immersion- This type of program requires an enrollment of both native English-speaking students and native speaking students of the partner language. Schools may choose to implement programs that are either full-immersion (50-50 model) or partial-immersion (90-10 model). Both immersion programs have been proven to have high success rates.

2. Heritage Language Programs- Participants of this language program are dominant in the English language but have parents, grandparents or other ancestors fluent in the partner language. This program addresses the needs of heritage language learners.

3. Foreign Language Immersion- Also known as one-way immersion, foreign language immersion involves students that are native English speakers in hopes to become fluent in the partner language. It is more in-depth than spending a portion of your day in Spanish class or French class.

4. Developmental Bilingual Programs- Enrollment in this type of program is specific to those who are native speakers of the partner language. Participants of this program will develop the necessary skills and strategies to not only succeed academically, but also be fully proficient and comfortable in both languages.

Currently, the vast majority of dual language programs in the U.S. are in English and Spanish however other languages with growing popularity include: Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, and Korean.

These variances in languages are a determined by a combination of factors including, but not limited to, school district demographics, community needs, and educator or student interest. Dual language programs are most commonly used in states such as Texas, New Mexico, California, and Hawaii however schools nationwide are looking into implementing this type of curriculum.

Success of Dual Language Education
Singapore’s current national bilingual education policy is an excellent example of how successful these programs can be.

By government order, students in the Singaporean education system are required to learn two languages, English and one of the other three official main languages of the country (Mandarin, Malay or Tamil). This has allowed nearly the entire literate population of Singapore to be fully bilingual all while unifying all members of its nation without sacrifice to any heritage.

Globalization: How It Has Affected Philippine Education And Beyond

Education before the 20th century was once treated as a domestic phenomenon and institutions for learning were once treated as local institutions. Prior to the 20th century, education was usually limited within the confines of a country, exclusively meant for the consumption of its local citizens. Scholars or college students did not have to travel miles away from their countries of origin to study and to gain skills which they needed in order to traverse the paths of their chosen careers. Moreover, national borders served as impenetrable walls in the name of sovereignty. Gaining a college degree and the skills entailed with it were merely for the purpose of staunch nationalistic service to one’s land of origin. Furthermore, knowledge of the valleys and the oceans encircling the world map, as well as foreign languages and international political regimes were not much of an imperative. Intercultural exchange was not massive and sophisticated, if not intricate. Acceptance and understanding of cultural diversity were not pressured upon anyone, as well as the lure to participate in a globally interconnected world. In other words, before the 20th century, scholastic work were predominantly simple and constrained in the local, the domestic, the nearby. They were limited to one’s own village, one’s own region, one’s own country. A student had his own neighborhood as the location where he is to be born, to be educated, and later to be of service to – the local village which is his home, his community, his country.

Nevertheless, the world has been in a constant state of flux. In the 20th century onwards, the phenomenon called globalization rose and became the buzzword. Anything which pertained to the term globalization was attributed to modernization, or anything that is up-to-date, if not better. Part and parcel of this trend is the advent and irresistible force of information technology and information boom through the wonders of the Internet. The idea of cosmopolitanism – a sense of all of humanity, regardless of race, creed, gender, and so on, living in a so-called global village – is another primary indicator of globalization. Moreover, international media as well as trade and investment have been unbridled and have occurred in a transnational nature. Finally, globalization has involved the uncontrollable movement of scholars, laborers, and migrants moving from one location to another in search for better employment and living conditions.

Apparently, globalization seemed to be all-encompassing, affecting all areas of human life, and that includes education. One indicator of this is the emergence of international education as a concept. Internationalization of education is manifested by catchphrases like The Global Schoolhouse, All the world’s a classroom, One big campus that is Europe, Think global. Act local, and Go West. Students from the world over have been ostensibly persuaded to learn about the world and to cope with technological advancements, if not to become a Citizen of the World. Moreover, globalization and international education are at play, for instance, when speaking of Singapore being branded as the Knowledge Capital of Asia, demonstrating the city-state as among the world’s academic powerhouses; De La Salle University in Manila, Philippines entering into agreements and external linkages with several universities in the Asian region like Japan’s Waseda University and Taiwan’s Soochow University for partnership and support; the establishment of branch campuses or satellites in Singapore of American and Australian universities like the University of Chicago and the University of New South Wales, respectively; online degree programs being offered to a housewife who is eager to acquire some education despite her being occupied with her motherly duties; students taking semesters or study-abroad programs; and finally the demand to learn English – the lingua franca of the modern academic and business world – by non-traditional speakers, like the Chinese, the Japanese, and the Korean students exerting efforts to learn the language in order to qualify for a place in English-speaking universities and workplaces. Apparently, all of these promote international education, convincing its prospective consumers that in today’s on-going frenzy of competition, a potent force to boost one’s self-investment is to leave their homes, fly to another country, and take up internationally relevant courses. Indeed, globalization and international education have altogether encouraged students to get to know their world better and to get involved with it more.

Boston College’s Center for International Higher Education director and International Education expert Philip Altbach asserted in his article “Perspectives on International Higher Education” that the elements of globalization in higher education are widespread and multifaceted. Clear indicators of globalization trends in higher education that have cross-national implications are the following:

1. Flows of students across borders;
2. International branch and offshore campuses dotting the landscape, especially in developing and middle-income countries;
3. In American colleges and universities, programs aimed at providing an international perspective and cross-cultural skills are highly popular;
4. Mass higher education;
5. A global marketplace for students, faculty, and highly educated personnel; and
6. The global reach of the new ‘Internet-based’ technologies.

Moreover, European Association of International Education expert S. Caspersen supported that internationalization influences the following areas: Curriculum, language training, studies and training abroad, teaching in foreign languages, receiving foreign students, employing foreign staff and guest teachers, providing teaching materials in foreign languages, and provision of international Ph. D. students. Nevertheless, globalization’s objective of a “one-size-fits-all” culture that would ease international transactions has not seemed to be applicable to all the nations of the world. In the words of Nobel Laureate economist Joseph Stiglitz, globalization’s effects are dualistic in nature. Globalization itself is neither good nor bad. It has the power to do enormous good. But in much of the world, globalization has not brought comparable benefits. For many, it seems closer to an unmitigated disaster. In Andrew Green’s 2007 book, “Education and Development in a Global Era: Strategies for ‘Successful Globalisation'”, he asserted that optimists would refer to the rise of East Asian tigers – Japan, China, and South Korea – as globalization’s success stories. But these are just a minority of the world’s two hundred nations. A majority has remained in their developing situations, among these is the Philippines.

In terms of international education being observed in the Philippines, universities have incorporated in their mission and vision the values of molding graduates into globally competitive professionals. Furthermore, Philippine universities have undergone internationalization involving the recruitment of foreign academics and students and collaboration with universities overseas. English training has also been intensified, with the language being used as the medium of instruction aside from the prevailing Filipino vernacular. Finally, Philippine higher education, during the onset of the 21st century, has bolstered the offering of nursing and information technology courses because of the demand of foreign countries for these graduates.

In terms of student mobility, although gaining an international training through studying abroad like in the United States is deemed impressive, if not superior, by most Filipinos, the idea of practicality is overriding for most students. Study-abroad endeavors are not popular among the current generation of students. The typical outlook is that it is not practical to study overseas obviously because of the expenses – tuition fees, living costs, accommodation, and airfare. Although financial aid may be available, they are hugely limited. There may be several universities that offer merit or academic scholarships, talent scholarships, athletic scholarships, teaching assistantships, research assistantships, full or partial tuition fee waivers, but actually there is certainly not a lot of student money. Apparently, international education is understood as a global issue, a global commodity, and above all, a privilege – and therefore, it is not for everyone. Hence, studying in America is a mere option for those who can afford to pay the expenses entailed in studying abroad.

The Philippines is a Third World country which is heavily influenced by developed nations like the United States. Globalization may have affected it positively in some ways, but a huge chunk of its effects has been leaning to the detriment of the Filipinos. Globalization has primarily affected not only the country’s education system but even beyond it – economically and socially. These include brain drain, declining quality in education because of profiteering, labor surplus, vulnerability of its workers overseas, and declining family values.

For one, the Philippines is a migrant-worker country. This phenomenon of sending its laborers (also known as Overseas Filipino Workers or OFWs) abroad to work and to send money back home has been intensified by globalization. Brain drain – or the exodus of talented and skilled citizens of a country transferring to usually developed nations for better employment and living conditions – is one problem that has been stepped up by globalization. The Philippine foreign policy of labor diplomacy began in the 1970s when rising oil prices caused a boom in contract migrant labor in the Middle East. The government of dictator Ferdinand Marcos, from the mid-1960s to the mid-1980s, saw an opportunity to export young men left unemployed by the stagnant economy and established a system to regulate and encourage labor outflows. This scenario has led Filipinos to study courses like nursing which would secure them employment overseas rather than in their home country. For more than 25 years, export of temporary labor like nurses, engineers, information technology practitioners, caregivers, entertainers, domestic helpers, factory workers, construction workers, and sailors were sent overseas to be employed. In return, the Philippine economy has benefited through the monetary remittances sent by these OFWs. In the last quarter of 2010, the Philippine economy gained roughly $18.76 billion in remittances which largely came from OFWs based in the United States, Saudi Arabia, United Kingdom, Japan, United Arab Emirates, Singapore, Italy, Germany, and Norway.

Second, the demand for overseas employment by these Filipino professionals has affected the quality of the local education system in the form of fly-by-night, substandard schools which were only aimed at profiteering. A Filipino legislator, Edgardo Angara, once aired his concern over the spread of many schools which offer courses believed to be demanded in foreign countries and the declining quality education. Angara observed that the Philippines has too much access to education versus quality education. For instance, for every five kilometers in this country, there is a nursing school, a computer school, a care-giving school, and a cosmetic school. Angara suggested that lawmakers and educators should find a happy formula for quality education.

Third, labor surplus is another dire effect of globalization. In 2008, the phenomenon of brain drain started to subside in the Philippines. This period was when the United States started to experience a financial turmoil which was contagious, distressing countries around the world which are dependent to its economy. In the Philippines, it has been surmised that the demand for nurses has already died down because the need for them has already been filled. For instance, the United States has decided that instead of outsourcing foreign nurses, they have resorted to employing local hires to mitigate its local problem of rising unemployment. As a result, this incident has receded the phenomenon of a majority of Filipino college students taking up nursing. And the unfortunate result is the labor surplus of nursing graduates. This dilemma which has been caused by a Third World country such as the Philippines trying to cope with globalization’s feature of labor outflows has left Filipinos on a double whammy. Over 287,000 nursing graduates are currently either jobless or employed in jobs other than nursing. Nursing graduates nowadays suffer job mismatch, taking on jobs which are different from their field of specialization like working for call centers, serving as English tutors, if not remaining unemployed because the Philippine hospitals have little to no vacancies at all which are supposed to be occupied by the large number of nursing graduates. Furthermore, these professionals are accepted by hospitals or clinics as volunteers with little to no monetary benefits, or as trainees who are burdened with the policy of forcibly paying the hospitals for their training.

Fourth, a dilemma that globalization has burdened the Philippines is the vulnerability of its overseas workers. For instance, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, United Arab Emirates, and Taiwan, have had no choice but to lay off and repatriate their Filipino guest workers in light of the global financial crisis. Furthermore, the threat of Saudization is a present concern in the Philippines nowadays. Presently, around 1.4 million OFWs in Saudi Arabia are in danger of losing their jobs because the Arab nation is implementing a Saudization program which will prioritize their Arab citizens for employment. To date, with more than 1.5 million OFWs, Saudi Arabia is the country which has the greatest concentration of OFWs. It is the largest hirer of Filipino Workers and has the largest Filipino population in the Middle East. As Saudi Arabia hosts a majority of OFWs, the problem of these Filipino workers losing their jobs and returning to their homeland where employment opportunities are scarce is a national threat. Furthermore, the current national instability in countries like Syria and Libya has threatened the lives of the OFWs, who still have chosen to stay in their foreign workplaces because of economic reasons which they find weightier vis-à-vis their safety.

Finally, globalization has resulted to social costs which involve challenges to Filipino families. Possessing close family ties, Filipino families sacrifice and allocate significant amounts of financial resources in order to support their kin. Filipino parents have the belief that through education, their children are guaranteed with promising futures and achieving decent lives. Thus, given the limited employment opportunities in the Philippines which are unable to support the needs of the family, one or both parents leave to work outside the country. As a result, Filipino children, although their educational goals and well-being are sustained, would have to survive with one or both parents away from them. They would then have to deal with living with an extended family member such as aunts, uncles or grandparents who are left to take care of them. This has deprived Filipino children of parental support and guidance as they are separated from the primary members of their family.

In reality, even though Filipino families have experienced the monetary benefits of a family member uprooting himself from the country to work overseas, this trend has not been enjoyed by the majority of Filipinos. The poorest of the poor cannot afford to leave and work overseas. Also, with volatile market forces, the value of the US dollar which is used as the currency of OFW salaries vacillating, rising gas prices and toll fees in highways, and the continued surge in the cost of living in the Philippines, in general, globalization has precluded long-term economic growth for the country, with the masses suffering a great deal. Moreover, with human capital and technological know-how important to growth, the Philippines suffered with globalization by losing its professionals to the developed countries which, on the other hand, experienced “brain gain”.

Indeed, globalization has both positive and negative effects, but in the Philippine case, it is more on the negative. It is justified to say that globalization is an “uneven process” and that most least developing countries did not grow significantly in light of globalization. Those which predominantly benefited are the affluent and powerful countries of the Western world and East Asia.

The Philippines was once considered as the “knowledge capital of Asia”, particularly during the 1960s and the 1970s. Its system of higher education was marked by high standards comparable to its neighboring countries, much lower tuition fees, and the predominant use of English as the medium of instruction. The Philippines, consequently, was able to entice students from its neighboring nations, like the Chinese, the Thais, and the Koreans. However, presently, this once upbeat picture has now been replaced by a bleak one because of several problems which has long confronted the system like budget mismanagement, poor quality, and job mismatch, thereby seriously affecting its consumers and end products – the Filipino students. Making matters worse is globalization affecting the graduates of Philippine universities by luring them to choose to work overseas because of the greater monetary benefits vis-à-vis the disadvantage of leaving their families home and not serving their countrymen. Now that the world is undergoing financial turmoil, the Filipino workers would then have to cope with these dire effects of globalization.

Apparently, the Philippines has remained stagnant, as opposed to the goals of increasing equality, rapid economic growth through integration into the global market, and the wide distribution of social improvements in less developed countries. These fruits of globalization, unfortunately, did not trickle down a great deal to the Philippines. Hence, although overseas employment has been a legitimate option for the local workers, it is high time that the Philippine government encourage colleges and universities to provide programs that are relevant to the nature of this substantially agricultural country like agriculture-related courses as these would play a significant role in setting the Philippine economy in motion towards development. The population boom in this country, which is commonly reckoned as among the country’s predicaments as the surging number of Filipinos is indirectly proportional to the employment opportunities available, should be taken advantage of by encouraging the surplus of people to develop employment and improve the rural farmlands. Affluent Filipino families who own large conglomerates should also participate in creating more employment opportunities and encouraging dignified labor conditions so as to mitigate the dismal trend of labor migration. Moreover, instead of adopting policies imposed by powerful Western countries like the United States and going with the flow, the Philippine government should work in reinforcing the welfare of its citizens more than anything else. (Sheena Ricarte, August 31, 2011).

President Obama’s State of the Union: What Industries and Education Can Help Your Career in 2011?

Jobs and the economy were the primary focus of President Obama’s State of the Union speech. The prospective federal job market is expanding and it is important to learn the steps to find a federal career.

Many of President Obama’s ideas won’t mean new jobs for at least another five years down the road. However, these jobs will likely be the wave of the future, so in order to prepare for this wave, think about what you will do today to prepare for the jobs that will be available, especially if you are thinking about your college major or preparing for a career change.

Specialized education and training in math, science, language and computer technology is becoming increasingly important. When attending college it is imperative to consider what jobs are available for graduates with that particular degree. In today’s innovative job market there are many growing hot job industries and fields to keep in mind when looking for a job or college major like:

  • Clean Energy
  • High-Speed Internet
  • High-Speed Rail
  • Exports
  • Domestic Construction
  • Biomedical Research
  • Research and Development
  • Renewable Energy
  • Electric Cars
  • Engineering
  • Information Technology
  • Global Business

If you are creative in your business or job, this will be important in your career for the future. Keep track of your creative ideas. This is also a keyword to use in your resume.

If you are currently a student in college, make sure that you take advantage of internships and other special programs. For example, if you are in your engineering degree now, make sure you get a project with an electric vehicle; this could help land a position in the future automotive industry. Write about this in your resume to demonstrate your past performance.

The government will always be hiring. Government positions will require specialized experience, depending on the positions you are seeking. You can read about federal jobs at http://www.usajobs.gov. You can find jobs by college major, job title, geographic location and agency name. Teaching positions are available if you have the right education and certifications. Also, some school systems are talking about top student performance salary incentives for teachers.

After this speech, education will be critical to succeed in all of these industries. Government jobs sometimes offer tuition reimbursement for students and parents who have student loans. Ask for this if you get a job offer.

As jobseekers continue to train to support these new industries, new training and education will be critical for career success. Jobs in curriculum design and planning, instructor-led programs, eLearning, distance learning and train-the-trainer will be also be on the rise to prepare people in all of these new industries.

Although the government will freeze federal salaries for the next two years, the government will be hiring more workers to support grants and programs for all of the ideas presented in this speech. The salaries will be frozen, but the career ladder positions in government will still get promotions. The government jobs are still the best in the country with excellent benefits and programs. The performance-based promotions to new grades will still be available to employees.

Engineers, international experts, contract specialists, IT specialists, administrative, accounting as well as many other professionals will be needed to support the enormous growth. Furthermore, the government is very interested in hiring new graduates to grow into these new industries.

President Obama’s speech included many new job and industry ideas. Most of the proposed jobs require specialized training and education. Pay attention to the industries, legislation and programs in support of these programs, and FOLLOW THE JOBS. In the meantime, look up courses and college majors that can support the new industries. A career strategy will be needed to succeed in these new industries. Start planning now, listen to President Obama’s additional speeches to see more activities and movement on these new jobs and training ideas.

Driver Education Training

Driver training is defined as behind-the-wheel lessons given to students once they complete the classroom program. State licensed instructors train students in dual-controlled vehicles equipped for safety. The instructor has a foot brake attached to the passenger side near the floor, so that the instructor may slow the student down at will. The students who do not meet the age requirement must get written permission from their parents or guardian.

During these in-car training sessions the instructors teach students different aspects of driving. They start by driving on a surface road and learning the basic controls of the car and how to operate it safely. They then progress on to more advanced skills like driving in the dark. At the final stage are trained to drive on the freeway and get exposure to heavy traffic while learning more complex defensive driving skills.

Behind-the-wheel training takes approximately 6 to 10 hours to complete and is spaced out in two-hour sessions taken at the student’s convenience. On completion of the driver-training program, students are awarded a certificate of completion that can then be used to get a driver’s license from the Division of Motor Vehicles. Of course, the student must then pass the DMV requirements, such as knowledge tests and a qualifying driving course.

Driver-training programs are very important for young drivers because they learn the right driving attitudes and develop proper techniques that make them safe and reliable drivers. Without these trainings, the roads would be even more chaotic than they already are.

High School

The world’s oldest known high school is in Edinburgh, Scotland. It began in 1505 and is the Royal High School. Thisl was used as a model to start the first high school in America, located in Boston, Massachusetts. The English High School began operations in 1821.

In the United States, a high school is a secondary education system that will educate children who are in the ninth grade trough the twelfth grade, or in the case of others, tenth grade through twelfth. Each state and district will have their own specific guidelines when to start the high school year, either adding ninth or not. Typically a child will be eighteen years old or approaching eighteen when he or she graduates in the United States.

There are several different categories of high schools in America. There are those that prepare children to hold basic technical careers, which they will work on during their school years. These schools are vocational schools, where many school districts within one county will gather students together. Another type of high school is the college preparatory school, which can be difficult to get into unless you have the early high grades throughout middle school.

These schools will teach subjects that children will need to go on to a university or college, especially if that college or university is an Ivy League one. Another type of high school is the alternative school, which is usually for children who are having behavioral problems for whatever reason and sometimes a judge or a therapist will insist that the child be enrolled in this high school. Some of the children who may attend this alternative school may have mental health issues that preclude them from attending a main stream school. Security risks would be too high to allow other children to attend classes with children who are suffering from severe mental health concerns. Some of these alternative schools are catered to those children who are experiencing drug and/or alcohol problems and need supervised treatment. A component of their treatment may include daily or weekly treatment with a therapist or drug and alcohol counselor.

Most schools in America begin their classes in late August or early September, and go until the next May or June, depending upon calamity days during the year. Children in the United States typically have the entire summer off from classes. Many people, especially some educators, would like to see American school districts adopt a year round calendar. Those who propose going to school year round state that it would benefit parents, who would not need as much day care help during the summer months and it would also benefit the children, because many times children lose a great deal of the knowledge during the summer months. Teachers sometime complain that the first month or so of the new school year is spent playing catch up, trying to remind children what they learned toward the end of the previous school year.